How to Write a Dynamic Book Review

 

As of 2015, Book Scan’s total print book sales recorded in at a whopping total of 653 million units. While ‘traditional print books increased almost 3%, and e-books’ share of the total market slipped from 27% in 2014 to 24% last year’, these statistics are still a sure-fire indicator of the public’s ongoing passion for reading books.

With so many readers on the hunt for the latest and greatest ‘good read’ in the literary melting pot, writing a dynamic book review that will grab the attention of a potential reader can make all the difference to a book’s success.

Writing the book review

First things first, you will have had to read the book. Secondly, once you have finished the book, you need to consider what to include in your review? Whether you are reviewing a book or a film, the structure or elements of a review remain the same.  Some book reviews include general information like who wrote the book?, what was the story about?, what is the theme?, and other highlights of the book, character, plot, etc.  But I have chosen to talk about writing a critical book review. 

There are five sections to a critical book review.

1, Identification of the work that is under review

2. Context of the work under review

3. Description of the work under review

4. Assessment of the reviewer

5. Identification of the reviewer

So let us go through each of these sections one by one.

1. Identification of the work under review

The first important thing is that the reader knows the identification details of the book that you are critiquing or reviewing.

When you begin to identify the work, include these details.

  • Who wrote it?
  • What is the title of the book?
  • Who else was involved, co-writers, illustrators?
  • When was it written/published?
  • Where was it published?

The identification panel or publication details are placed before the actual review, like this:

Author
Title of the work
Publisher
ISBN Number
Price
Number of pages
Format of the book (paper-back Pb or hardback Hb)

If the book is to be rated on the internet, like on the Amazon website, you will notice that there are a set of four or five stars that will be included, so that you can click on them to give the book a rating.

2. Context of the work under review

Once you have identified the work that is under review, you can start writing the review. In this part of your review you will place the book into a wider context, so that you are establishing a background and framework for the book. You can use a social-cultural or historical context or a literary context.

Here is a list of contexts that you can use in your review:

Author’s books. Has the author written other books? You need to have read or have a good knowledge of other books by the author.

Genre. Include some brief details about the history of the genre, past and present works in the same genre. Again, you will need to be familiar with genre classification, and other authors who write in the same genre.

Current issues, debates or news. This is the part of the review that will require some research to make sure that the issues or debates/subjects or themes that you will use in your review is relevant and up to date.

Personal reading experience. This part of the context requires you to draw upon your own reading experience or tastes, but remember that the book review is not about what you like or dislike. Keep the reader in mind, your focus should be on the book and its author, and why the reader should (or should not) read the book.

Also, when readers read reviews, they will also be critical of the reviewer as well as the ideas that you are using in the review.

3. Description of the work under review

The third element of the review is the section where you need to describe the book. You will have read the book and be familiar with it. The reader has not read the book and they want to have a good idea of it before they decide to purchase it. So when you start to describe the book, here are some ideas to include.

Overall Description

Describe the genre of the book. Is it a historical romance or a crime thriller?

Theme or topic of the book. Is it a battle for a fantasy world or a hunt for a serial killer?

Writing style of the author. Does the writer use a first person or third person narration? Is is written in a diary style?

Issues that are explored in the book. Does the book cover issues that relate specifically to women, or are there issues that relate to animal rights or ecological concerns?

Literary techniques.  What kind of techniques does the author uses to create the story-world. Does the author use streams of consciousness, flashbacks, etc.

Setting of the book. Is it a beach setting or a futuristic world?

Plot strategies. Does the author start at the end of the story and develop the plot from there? Are there plot twists? Is there a continuous smooth flowing plot or are there multiple plot lines?

Characters. Who is the hero? What is their conscious need or goal? Is their desire for freedom, protection of loved ones, pursuit of a love interest. Who is the villain? How do they provide the conflict in the book?

Specific Description

You can provide quotes or illustrative images from the book, or use a direct quote from the author about the book.

4. Assessment of the reviewer

The assessment of the reviewer is the most important part of the review. You have provided the foundation of the review by building your case for the book with the context and description (the greater social and literary context, genre style, writing style of the author, plot strategies, character profile, and personal reading experiences).

All of these details establish you as a reliable critic who can now make their final judgment, and give the book either a one star or a five star rating.

5. Identification of the reviewer

In this final section of the book review, and also an important one, is where you identify yourself as the critic or reviewer. The identification of the reviewer provides your status as a reviewer and contributes to your credibility as a reliable literary voice, which will also boost the authenticity of the review.

Your identification should be a short bio that is located at the end of the review. Some relevant details to include can be as follows:

  • Professional experience.
  • Reading experience or any books that you have may have written
  • Experience as a critic (if any)
  • Life experience ( university degrees, etc)

A check list for writing the book review.

Before you begin to write your book review, consider this questions:

Who is the readership for the book? You need to consider your readership. Is the review to be shown in a literary magazine, a university journal, or a general women’s magazine. Every publication or website has its own demographic, and an audience with a particular level of expertise and reading experience.

What is the publication’s particular style? Depending on where you will be publishing the review: in a magazine, a newspaper, or on your own website, each medium will have its own style, and require a particular tone or type of ‘voice’ from its writers.

What are the current issues in the world? It is always a good idea to be well read or be media savvy, so that you can use that knowledge to provide a well grounded socio-cultural background for the review.

What is your particular aim, or what kind or angle are you going to take in writing the review? You need to be aware of your intentions or what you want to achieve with this review? Consider these four questions:

1. Do you want to be objective or subjective?
2. Are you representing a particular audience?
3. Are you a fan of the author or book?
4. Do you see the book as a ‘must read’ (is it covering a controversial topic or a social justice issue like human trafficking?)

Finally, if you are going to write a negative review, you need to think about it very carefully. You will need to justify your views by establishing the reasons ‘why’ you are providing a negative review. If you are going to give your opinion, it has to be more than just “I hated the work”; your review has to be presented with a good balance of objective and subjective voice.

Writing a book review is a combination of being well read, being aware of what is going on in the greater world, keeping up with cultural, literary and genre trends, and to be aware of the needs and interests of readers.

Happy writing!

 

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Can Your Learning Style Determine How You Read a Story?

Storytelling is an integral part of human culture. Although storytelling has been around for thousands for years, whether it be through the earliest cave paintings, oral tradition, or via digital mediums, storytelling continues to be of great importance to the way we communicate.

In my conversations, I have discovered that there are many people who don’t like reading a book, which is hard for me to fathom as I have always been an avid reader. Some people have never read a book and the only kind of reading they engage in takes place on the internet. How much they are missing out on!

I believe that reading is so important, aside from providing an opportunity to temporarily escape from reality, it allows us to explore a range of human experiences that may vary from our own, and it can help to develop our imagination and our language skills. 

Books are an important part of our human history. From the moment of their first introduction into the world, they have provided opportunities for people to learn to read, to experience the greater world that was inaccessible at that time, and the humble book has even ignited revolutions.

There are many reasons why people avoid reading a book. They may not have cultivated a love for reading from a young age, they may have a learning disability, or they may not have access to a book in their language. But here is an interesting question: can your learning style determine how you experience a story?

There is another significant reason why reading a book is avoided; we all have different ways of learning and absorbing information.

Three Learning Styles

Extensive study and research show that there are three different ways of learning and absorbing information. They are called the Three Learning Styles or Techniques. I had learned about these learning styles some years ago and they have helped me to understand the best way for me to learn, absorb and retain information.

Once you have discovered your learning style it will change the way you perceive information. It will help you to choose the best way of experiencing a story and ultimately enhance your reading experience.

Here are the Three Learning Styles.

Although there are different approaches in explaining these learning styles, I have chosen to use a basic description.

Visual (Spatial)

You learn via the visual sense – seeing and looking.
You like images, pictures, and illustrations.
You like taking notes.
You tend to visualize things (settings, characters) in your mind when you are reading.

Audio

You learn via the auditory sense.
You like to listen to discussions and hear people talk.
You like reading aloud.

Kinesthetic

You learn by doing and by the sense of touch.
You like to engage in activities.
You like to ask questions during an activity.
You like working or talking with others in a team or group.

Why not try this creative exercise to discover your learning style. 

Once you have discovered what your dominate learning style is (there will usually be one main style that defines you), you can find a storytelling medium that best suits you.

Four Different Ways to Experience a Story.

Besides reading a book, there are many different ways to experience a story.

Audio Books

As well as audiobooks, you can also find websites where a book narrator provides stories via a podcast. Here is one website: Kris Keppeler narrates short stories. 

Watch a film with friends

If you are a kinesthetic person and watching a film or the television by yourself is boring, you could have a film night and discuss the film with your friends afterward as a group.

Smart televisions also allow for a community interactive experience. You can engage with other viewers by leaving comments via social media whilst watching a show.

DVD

Most DVD’s these days have an extra feature where you can listen to (and watch) the Director or Actors talk about the film, and a section where you can engage in social media discussions, or even choose alternate endings to a film.

Graphic novels

Books with pictures are a great way to encourage reading for the younger generation: children and adolescents. Developing a child’s reading experience at an early age can lead to an ongoing relationship with books that can extend into their maturing years. It can help them develop language skills, teach them to use their imagination, and promote empathy and intercultural understanding.

Digital Devices

If you are sight challenged or just a Digital Device fan, you can download books via Kobo or iBooks. Digital devices also allow for multiple book downloads and greater portability.

Internet/Social Media Platforms

There is ongoing research that argues that reading via the internet can be detrimental to our reading experience: it can affect our neural pathways by causing an inability to concentrate for long periods. But for those who are visual and/or kinesthetic, it can be a struggle to focus on just words on a page, so the internet provides many different ways of experiencing a story: YouTube, social media platforms like Facebook, and websites where you can share stories and chat with other writers.

Here are some creative writing websites.

Apollo Blessed
Skrawl
Scriggler

Digital Storytelling

Although digital storytelling is still being developed, you can learn how this breakthrough method of storytelling combines the three learning styles: visual, audio and kinesthetic. Have a look at my blog post on Digital Storytelling.

Immersing yourself in a story by reading a text-based book has so many benefits, but it may not suit everyone.  But when you discover your perfect learning style and choose a storytelling medium that suits your style, you will be able to fully discover the magical world of storytelling and enhance your reading experience.

 

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Top Five Authors Who Can Inspire New Creative Writers

I have been inspired by many authors throughout my creative writing journey, and as it helps to learn from the best, I have compiled a list of the top five authors who can inspire new creative writers

No. 1.  James Patterson

James Patterson is a highly successful American Crime Writer who is famous for his fast paced, heart stopping and gripping thrillers. As a long time fan of James Patterson, I have never been disappointed. I have just finished Alex Cross, Run, and I was intrigued by the dual plot-lines, with Alex Cross hunting down two psychopathic killers, while also being hunted by a revengeful nemesis who will stop at nothing in destroying Cross’s reputation and family.

The Alex Cross series is a favourite as Patterson’s hero is a classic example of a four dimensional character. We see Cross in dual social spaces, his work and home life, we have access to his intimate thoughts, and more importantly we have access to the perspective of the nemesis or villain on Cross. Alex has victories and temporary defeats and exhibits many character flaws, which are highlighted  in this novel. These characters flaws help us to identity with his struggles as we cheer him on as he fights against evil.

Patterson also knows how to draw his readers into the short bursts of action contained in his novels.  He also provides us with a detailed outline of the psychology of his villains.

His dialogue is straight to the point, and every word is strategically placed and is used to good effect. Also his book chapters are short and there is plenty of white space, which provides for a pleasant reading experience. 

No 2. Patricia Cornwell. 

Patricia Cornwell is one of my favourite forensic crime thriller authors. Her heroine, Dr Kay Scarpetta, is a dedicated medical examiner who not tracks down serial killers but she has also been on the receiving end of crime. Scarpetta has had her share of complicated romantic and family relationships and she expresses empathy for the victims of crime.  

Cornwall’s writing style is engaging, and she keeps the reader guessing up until the finale. She also rates quite high on my list for the creation of a strong and sassy female character, who is not afraid to get her hands dirty, and she can hold her own in a male dominated world.

No. 3. Sophie Kinsella

Among many of her books, Confessions of a Shopaholic (2001) is a bestseller that has secured a global readership and ongoing commercial success. Whether you love or hate chick-lit, Kinsella’s narratives are easy to read and her characters are humorous.

Shopaholic has gained in popularity with its predominately youthful demographic of readers, due to its references to recognisable fashion brands, magazines, and department stores. It also features ‘chick-lit style’ characters, like the famous Bridget Jones, who tend to be urban women, employed in the media industry, are relatively successful, and continually struggle with romantic foibles or consumerist angst, with sobering, but hilarious results.

Kinsella’s book has undergone scathing reviews as many media commentators have tried to understand the book’s success, and many feminist writers have lashed out at the depiction of women in her books, but regardless of the socio-political uproar, the book’s key selling element is its lovable leading lady, Becky Bloomwood, who has catapulted Kinsella to literary notoriety.

Bloomwood is the bumbling and ditzy heroine who gives out financial advice in her day job, whilst being chronically in debt due to her out of control shopping addiction. While Bloomwood and her crazy antics provide for a good laugh, there is clear message about the effects of mass consumerism and crippling financial debt without being too preachy.

From a storytelling perspective, Kinsella’s characters are hilarious, the plot is faced paced, similar to that of a crime thriller, and her writing style keeps the reader riveted to the narrative up to the last page.

No. 4. Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins is another highly successful book that continues to dominate the literary field of mass market adolescent books.

I had never heard of The Hunger Games before the films premiered, and in hearing the arguments for and against their controversial content, I saw some of the films and then decided to read the first novel in the series.

Collin’s storytelling adequately draws the reader into a Dystopian world that lives in fear of an annual sadistic reality television show that involves a gladiatorial style of combat with a twist – the opponents are ordinary teenagers as opposed to skilled soldiers.

The Hunger Games is also an interesting example of an intriguing generic mix. It draws upon a mix of science fiction, adventure, drama, and action. Its key selling point is the unique combination of a popular 21st century television phenomenon – ‘Reality TV’ – and the Romanesque style of entertainment.

I chose The Hunger Games for this list of top five authors, not because of his mass appeal, but due to the main character, Katniss Everdeen, the young heroine whose bravery and sacrifice is the driving force behind the plot as she volunteers to take her younger sister’s (Prim) place in the games.

Collins has created a dynamic heroine who is an active female character who not only becomes a symbol for bravery for her hometown of Seam in District 12, but she has also been tagged as a positive symbol of courage for modern day teenage girls.

Although the book has raised controversial debates over its high levels of violence that is perpetrated by children, it is Katniss who heroically displays empathy and inner strength in the face of such violence.

The controversial debates have not affected the book’s popularity as it has reached almost mythic proportions in its readership popularity.

No. 5. Daphne Du Maurier

Daphne Du Maurier is an English author, who bases the majority of her narratives in Cornwell, Southern England.

Her novels were inspired by the mysterious, yet breathtaking landscape of the Cornish countryside, the idyllic, yet secretive villages, and especially the shifting moods of the beautiful, but sometimes treacherous, Bodmin moor.

Daphne is an all-round storyteller who has not limited herself to one genre. She displays a talent for being able to create novels that cross many genres/sub-genres such as: a short story collection that centres on the macabre, a speculative fiction novel, The House on the Strand, that combines the supernatural and science fiction, and also historical romances.

Many of Du Maurier’s historical romances contain an element of mystery, and the narratives foreground strong active female heroines.  Novels like Jamaica Inn and Rebecca centre on heroines who endure hardship either due to abusive or conflicted men, and these women are often left to fend for themselves in isolated and gloomy houses that carry dark secrets. Although it seems at times that these women are doomed to fight a losing battle, they are victorious, and their abusers or antagonists are brought to justice.

Although there are many great storytellers to choose from these days, I have chosen just a few of my favourite top five authors who have inspired me in my creative writing journey.  I hope that they inspire you as well. 

 

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Top Five Best Books for Children

 

The best way to become a great creative writer is to be a dedicated reader and to develop a love of books from childhood. I have been reading ever since I was a child and I could not image my life without books.

Books are magical portals that allow their readers unmitigated access to new and undiscovered worlds, and they provide uninterrupted journeys into the soul. They can take us on a journey into the realm of the imagination, and allow us to become part of another person’s life experiences. Here is a list of the Top Five Best Books for Children.

 

Anne of Green Gables.  Lucy Maud Montgomery. 

The timeless tale of the adventures of Anne Shirley, the spirited red headed orphan with a heart of gold, continues to capture the hearts and imaginations of children all over the world. Lucy Maud Montgomery published eight novels that feature Anne and her family, and the spirit of Anne lives on in additional short story collections like The Chronicles of Avonlea and The Road to Yesterday.

 

The Famous Five. Enid Blyton.

The Famous Five is a book series that was written by English author Enid Blyton, and was first published in 1942. The series follows a group of children, Julian, Dick, Anne, Georgina (George) and her dog Timmy, who live in Dorset, South-West England. The children’s adventures range from finding buried treasure, exploring secret tunnels, and exposing smugglers. There are 21 novels in the series, so there are plenty of adventures for children to explore.

 

The Secret Garden. Frances Hodgson Burnett. 

The Secret Garden is a timeless drama/fantasy novel, which was originally published in 1910. The heroine, Mary Lennox, is a sickly, unloved and selfish ten-year old who is born to wealthy English parents living in India. Most of Mary’s life is spent being cared for by servants, and after her parents die from Cholera, she is sent to live in Yorkshire, England, with her morose uncle, Archibald Craven, at Misselthwaite Manor. Mary continues to be a rude and disagreeable child, and spends her time being confined to the gloomy and mysterious manor. But after discovering a secret garden, Mary begins to learn about the healing power of friendship.

 

Matilda.  Roald Dahl.

Matilda is an intelligent, caring and gifted little girl who is often mistreated or neglected by her boorish parents. From a young age Matilda has to fend for herself, but finds a welcome escape from her troubled home life through her insatiable appetite for reading. In response to her parent’s neglect she often amuses herself by playing pranks on her family like gluing her father’s hat to his head.

At school, Matilda befriends her kind teacher, Miss Honey, a kindred spirit, who encourages Matilda to develop her exceptional intellectual abilities. Miss Honey hides her own pain and sorrow as her sadistic and manipulative aunt, Miss Agatha Trunchbull, is also the headmistress of the school. The Trunchbull, as she is tagged by the students, delights in inflicting cruel and unusual punishments on the children for minor infractions. While Matilda, Miss Honey and the other students live in fear of the tyrannical Trunchbull, Matilda discovers her growing power of telekinesis, which she uses to finally oust the headmistress.

Matilda’s wish for a loving family is finally bestowed when her father, a corrupt car salesman, decides to escape from the police, and he readily agrees to let his misunderstood daughter live with Miss Honey.

Dahl’s wonderful tale is an empowering book with an anti-bullying message flowing through the narrative, and it also teaches children to embrace their gifts and to respect others despite their differences.

 

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe: The Chronicles of Narnia. C. S. Lewis.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was first published in 1950 and its magical tale of adventure will never lose its literary appeal for children or adults. A classic fantasy tale of good versus evil, it also has an emphasis on the innocence of childhood, and the power of friendship.

The story begins where a group of English children, Peter, Susan, Lucy and Edmond, are sent to live with their uncle in his house in the countryside, after a wartime evacuation. After discovering a magical wardrobe, the children discover Narnia, a world of talking animals and mythical beasts who live in fear of an evil witch who keeps the land enslaved in a perpetual winter.  

The continuing appeal of these Top Five Best Books for Children goes beyond the world of books as all of these stories have been turned into television series, films and stage-plays.  

 

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Magic Books.

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The Power of Books and the Influence of Literature

 

For this week’s post I thought I would share my thoughts on the power of books and the influence of literature.  I would also like to compare the level of reading that takes place on the Internet as opposed to the reading of a book.  I have read a few articles on the hotly debated idea that high levels of interaction with the Internet could be ruining our concentration and changing the way we think as opposed to the reading of a book. So in order to brainstorm some ideas about the power of books and the influence of literature,  I will be using the format of a personal essay which is in response to the following essay question:

“Look at my bookshelf! These are the books I read. To what extent can literature have an influence on or affect people’s lives? Discuss and explore.”

“I recollect nothing of learning to read; I only remember what effect the first considerable exercise of it produced on my mind; from that moment I date an uninterrupted knowledge of myself’” (Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 1923, p. 7).

I cannot envision my life without books, and by books, I mean the good old fashioned paperback, not the static digital downloads that are on offer today. The humble book, whether it be a collection of short stories or a complex novel, have been to me, as Amos Bronson Alcott so aptly described, “books are…the best of companions, accessible at any moment…[and they] reward me with their company” (1872, p. 133).

Books provide me with an opportunity to open my imagination. They invite and entice me to embark on cost-free journeys to undiscovered realms and have enlarged my vocabulary.

I have been reading since I was very young and back then I would have read almost anything, even fashionista magazines, like Cleo and Women’s Weekly. Books of all genres have had a profound influence on me and have instilled a great love of the written word and a passion for writing. I had no need for pictures or illustrations, for the words and my imagination conjured up the necessary images, to visualize the scenarios contained.

 I would spend hours going through my nana’s bookshelf and explore the Reader Digest, starting with the humorous section“Mere Male” and then onto the “Real Life” story for that edition. I then started working my way through autobiographies, such as Corrie Ten Boom’s The Hiding Place.  Above all, my favorite books were: The Anne of Green Gables series, The Narnia Chronicles, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Lord of the Rings, and John’s Bunyan’s A Pilgrims Progress. My bookshelf still includes some of these books and I find myself going back and reading them again and again and still they enthrall me.

In high school, I was introduced to the unique realm of poetry and enjoyed reading and experiencing poems by literary wordsmiths, such as the Australian poet, Kenneth Slessor, in particular, ‘Beach Burial’, a mournful but beautifully crafted elegy for unnamed soldiers that were washed ashore at El Alamein. As Anthony Lawrence says about his introduction to poetry “… these poems gave me something I’d never encountered: a need to live for my imagination” (The Paper Trail 2010, p. 40).

My latest literary rambles have taken me into the world of the likes of Josephine Cox, whose novels are predominately set in Blackburn, England, in the 1800’s. I have spend many hours with the well rounded and engaging characters of Joy Fielding, the very down to earth and hilariously eventful novels of Sophie Kinsella, and have been riveted by the thrilling, nail biting suspense of James Patterson – just to name a few.

This is not to say that I have not read other works of literature, in order to understand the world of the past and present. During my course of study, books of academia have been added to my repertoire and have served to enrich my life in ways that a humble story cannot. I have enjoyed reading books on art, music and history, but my book of choice has always been a work of fiction.

A story is a work of art in itself and the interest in storytelling is universal, whether it be a child reading a book for the first time or an adult watching a movie.  The practice of storytelling is intrinsic to how we communicate and are entertained. Above all other mediums, through which storytelling is conveyed, none has the potential to draw us in, to hold us spellbound, but the unassuming book. But even more than storytelling, books have ignited revolutions, provided people with the opportunity to read in their own language, and to have access to information that was previously withheld from them.

In a world that is addicted to the power of technology, and a digital cyberworld that demands our attention, where we are compelled to work and play almost at the speed of light, the book invites us to draw aside, to curl up in our favourite chair, turn off the incessant mobile phone and enjoy a good yarn.

My bookshelf predominately contains books that are devoted to stories, from the impressive novel, that can suck you in and destroy a holiday as it has done many times for me, to the short story that can “… lay claim to a kind of completeness that eludes the novel” (Millhauser 2008).

During my short stint in youth work, I came across young people who had never read a book of any kind. Literature was a word from a foreign language and if they were ever tempted to try to read a book, it would have to contain pictures. Their attention span did not reach beyond the email, the phone text, or the next tweet.

As this world seems to get smaller due to the advances in technology and conversation is fast becoming limited to Facebook and Twitter – how does the book compete? Every now and then I visit my local library and am amazed to see people still reading and borrowing real books.

I believe that literature is so essential to our development and for our understanding of the world around us and our place in it. Exposure to reading literature should start from a young age as it enlarges the imagination and introduces a child to the greater world. Literature has the power to influence and affect people’s lives in many ways and one of the most defining influences is the level of interaction a book invites as opposed to the type of reading that takes places on the Internet

In his book, The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, Nicholas Carr argues that “the Internet could be altering the very structure of our brains” (Carr in Harris 2010).  He also raises an interesting comparison between the type of reading on the Internet and the reading of a book.  The Internet’s “cacophony of stimuli” and “crazy quilt” of information have given rise to “cursory reading, hurried and distracted thinking, and superficial learning” – in contrast to the age of the book, when intelligent humans were encouraged to be contemplative and imaginative” (Carr in Harris 2010).

But despite these Internet-based concerns by Carr and others, as long as people continue to read books and to write the stories that are contained within their pages, the power of the book and the influence of literature will continue to remain as a central part of our personal lives and our society.

 

Reference List.

Alcott Bronson Amos 1872, Concord Days, June, Books p. 133, Published by
Roberts Brothers. Boston. U.S.A.

Harris J 2010, ‘How the internet is altering your mind‘, The Guardian, viewed 14 March, 2016.

Lawrence A 2010, ‘Paper trail’, in Krauth, N & Brady, T, The Clunes little book of the book: five leading authors reflect on their relationship with the book, Creative Clunes, Clunes, Victoria, pp. 39-46.

Milhauser S 2008,  The Ambition of the Short Story‘ The New York Times, p. 31.

Rousseau Jean-Jacques 1923, ‘The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Part One, Book 1, P. 7. Published by Alfred. A. Knopf, New York

Additional reading.

Lehrer J 2010, Our Cluttered Minds‘ , from Hasselberger, William. “The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains.” Sunday Book Review, The New York Times, Web. 15 March, 2016. 

 

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Old Books. Josealbafotos

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