Scriggler: an Online Creative Community That Will Revitalize Your Writing

In one of my recent blog posts, I shared some tips on how to revitalize your writing. Creative writing is a predominately solo occupation, countless hours are spent brainstorming unique story ideas, dreaming up new worlds, creating dynamic characters, and exciting plots.

Whatever kind of writing you like, whether you are a journalist, a novelist or a poet, chances are you will spend most of your time alone in the creative zone. Although many writers thrive when they are working solo, others may find it quite limiting and suffer quite regularly from that dreaded literary nemesis, Writer’s Block. If you are the kind of person who thrives on interaction and your learning style is Kinesthetic:

You learn by doing and by the sense of touch. 
You like to engage in activities. 
You like to ask questions during an activity.
You like working or talking with others in a team or group.

 

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Then here is another great tip that can help you revitalise your writing and get those creative neurons firing: join an online community like Scriggler.

Scriggler is a writing, blogging and debating platform. A creative place where you can write and read on any topic, in any level of detail. Whether you enjoy writing short stories, poetry, or you want to share your opinion on a topic that you are passionate about, Scriggler gives you the opportunity to connect with a global audience of writers and readers.

Each month Scriggler runs a writing contest, there is a book promotion service available, and writing prompts and challenges that will help you to get inspired and achieve greater creativity.

Five reasons you should be involved on Scriggler.

1. You can create your own personal creative page.

2. You can engage with other creative writers from all over the world: You can comment on their work, and they can provide feedback on your creation.

3. Scriggler attracts a global readership. Your short story or poem was never meant to stay hidden in a creative void. That literary baby that you have brought to life and nurtured was born so that it can be shared with the world.

 

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4. You will be inspired by reading work from other writers. Each writer’s journey is different, and when you are a part of an online writing community you have the opportunity to learn from other writers and chat about your literary experiences.

5. You can grow your online fan base. Whenever you submit a new article, Scriggler will promote your work on social media platforms like Twitter or Facebook, which can increase your global online presence.

Two examples of the rewards that can be yours as a member of the Scriggler community.

There is nothing better than a personal testimony to the rewards that be received from being involved with a creative writing community.

I have been on Scriggler since June 2016:

1. One of my micro-fiction tales has been narrated by a fellow Scriggler, Kris Keppeler, on her podcast.

2. My short story, Muse, is being considered for publication in a short story anthology.

So why not discover the benefits of being involved in a writing, blogging and debating community like Scriggler. In the midst of like-minded people, you will discover that the creative possibilities for your writing are endless!

 

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Six More Creative Tips to Revitalise Your Writing

 

New and experienced writers can sometimes find themselves struggling to brainstorm new narratives. Our ideas pool looks like it’s all fished out and our once helpful creative muse has left the building. But never despair, when you’re faced with writer’s block and that blank computer screen seems to mock your inability to create, here are six creative tips to revitalise your writing and get you back into storytelling mode.

No. 1. Flash, Nano or Micro Fiction.

Specific word choice and brevity is important for a creative writer. Making each word count and telling a story well in the best possible way can distinguish a good writer from a great one. Writing to a particular word count can help you streamline your writing skills and can kick-start a lot of creative story ideas.

Flex your creative muscles by trying the Ernest Hemingway challenge: Write a Story in Six Words, or in 100 words. I like this style of writing mainly because it stimulates the creative side of the brain, therefore allowing new ideas to be born. A longer narrative can be born out of a Flash/Nano or Micro tale, so be brave and take up a Micro Fiction challenge.

No. 2. Re-write a Folk or Fairy Tale.

With so many folk and fairy tales out there you are sure to find one that is desperately in need of a re-write or refresh. Many of the female roles like the passive princess can be changed to a butt-kicking no nonsense princess. You can also change the story into a modern day setting with 21st century socio-cultural and political themes. Check out my version of the Rapunzel tale, The Tale of Ruthie and Grace in my free eBook, Exploring the Narrative World: Writing the Short Story

No. 3. Choose a Short Story and Write It Into a Short or Feature Film.

This is a great exercise for writers. The short story ‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’ was written by James Thurber in 1939 and was remade into a blockbuster film with Ben Stiller in 2013. The task of choosing key settings, events and characters from a work of fiction is performed by many successful Hollywood screenwriters. So why not take one of your favourite short stories or Google one and try transforming the narrative into a short or feature film.

No. 4. Interview a Parent/Grandparent and Write a Story Based on their Experiences.

Parents and grandparents have so many interesting life stories that are just waiting to be crafted into a story that can impact the world. The saying ‘truth is stranger than fiction’ can make for a compelling tale even more so that a purely fictional tale. This storytelling exercise can also benefit a lonely elderly person in a nursing home or retirement village. Once you have interviewed your willing participant, and have written the story, you can print it out and give to your real-life hero or heroine as a gift.

No. 5. Pick Five Everyday Items and Write a Short Narrative. (Give them human-like qualities. Describe them as if they were alive, and had feelings. Or choose one of your family pets and create a story around them.)

This exercise was originally a poetry exercise but it can also be used in narrative fiction. You can start by writing a short narrative about how the item, like a mobile phone, has human qualities and would feel about having to constantly supply on demand unlimited information.

Here is an example of an everyday item that has been endowed with human qualities.

A Mobile/Cellphone.

Her bright exuberant face tantalises me with the happy expectations of friends and unlimited social invites, none of which I am invited to.  As a solitary observer of the many delights and distresses of her daily existence, I am a constant companion, but I am no more than an expert supplier for her excessive demands for sometimes useless and unnecessary information.

My revenge upon this fanatical digital ogre who relentlessly taps away at my delicate silver skin is my shrill shrieks and incessant clanging when she would rather be snoozing. I am an electronic prosthesis that is also an extension of her inner life.  As she sleeps, I dream of an immanent future where I will have the power to invade her innermost being and control her body, soul and spirit.

No. 6. Write a Story with One Character or Write a Story without a Character. 

Although this type of creative exercise can narrow the boundaries of the storytelling world, it is a favourite with some writers.  

Write a story with the main character as the omniscient narrator/focaliser. Many non-fiction narratives use this style. Boris Glikman uses this technique a lot. Many of his short stories take on a metaphysical or philosophical outlook on life. You can view some of his stories in the Unearthed Fiction magazine.

I hope you find these six creative tips to revitalise your writing helpful. 

Happy writing!

 

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